"Washington Crossing the Delaware" by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze

Revolutionary War Books for Children in Pre-K through Elementary

Katie Merkel

Hello everyone!

Before I get into how fascinating the Revolutionary War is, I have an important announcement to make.

Announcement: Due to needing to devote time to several creative projects on which I am working, I will not be adding new blog posts for the foreseeable future.

Now, on to the American Revolution.

If you like underdogs, spies, and life or death situations, then the Revolutionary War is the historical topic for you. The United States of America’s birth as a nation was very exciting.

The recommended books in this post give young readers a solid foundation upon which to build future knowledge about the Revolutionary War and introduce them to a handful of the fascinating people who made incredible sacrifices and risked their lives for this great country. Since every child learns to read at his/her own pace, the age range I listed for each book refers to the ages when I believe that a child will be able to sit through the reading of the book and engage with the content. I divided the books into the following sections:

Although most of my Revolutionary War book recommendations are for elementary-age children, I was able to find some that are appropriate for children in Pre-K and Kindergarten. Below are listed the section headings where those books can be found.

Take History with a Grain of Salt: While I try to recommend books that accurately portray historical figures and events, take all books with a grain of salt. None of the authors were alive during the events, and the Revolutionary War predates cell phone videos. One common error that I came across while selecting books to recommend was the number of men killed as a result of being shot in the Boston Massacre (this is probably due to the fact that not all of the victims died on March 5, 1770). The correct number of victims killed is five: Crispus Attucks, Samuel Gray, and James Caldwell died on March 5, 1770; Samuel Maverick died on March 6, 1770; and Patrick Carr died on March 14, 1770.

History or Legend: It is important to note that some well-known people from the Revolutionary War era did not have well-documented lives outside of the event or contribution that made them famous. Others’ stories were told in such a way that their contribution became more legend than fact. Still others became well-known because of something they, or someone else, claimed that they did, but there is no or limited documentation to support the claim. Some of the books I recommend are about individuals whose stories may not be perfectly accurate for one or more of these reasons.

  • Crispus Attucks – Crispus Attuck’s death is better documented than his life, and there was some variation in witness accounts of the Boston Massacre.
  • Molly Pitcher – Some historians think Molly Pitcher is a legend representing multiple women’s contributions to the Revolutionary War; others think she was Mary Hays. Many details about Mary Hays’ life, including her birthdate and birth location, are debated.
  • Paul Revere – Although Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem made Paul Revere famous, the poem contains several historical inaccuracies. Therefore, I have not included Longfellow’s poem among my book recommendations and tried to only share books that accurately relate the events of Paul Revere’s midnight ride.
  • Betsy Ross – William Canby, Betsy Ross’ grandson, claimed that George Washington commissioned Betsy Ross to make the first American flag and that she suggested making the stars have five points instead of six, but the claim is unsupported.

After browsing through the recommended books, be sure to check out the crafts, English assignments, games, songs, and video summaries about the Revolutionary War that I shared at the end of the post.

Book Recommendations

General Information about the Revolutionary War

The Tuttle Toddlers ABCs of the American Revolution by Connor Boyack and Elijah Stanfield goes through the alphabet listing someone or something from the Revolutionary War for each letter and offering a short description about it. This book is ideal for children in Preschool-1.

Yankee Doodle America: The Spririt of 1776 from A to Z by Wendell Minor goes through the alphabet listing something from the Revolutionary War for each letter and offering one or two short paragraphs about each person, event, or item. This book is ideal for children in Preschool-2 depending on whether or not you read all the explicative paragraphs.

Paul Revere Didn’t Say “The British Are Coming!”: Exposing Myths about the American Revolution by Shalini Saxena presents several well-known myths associated with the American Revolution, states what really happened, and, in some cases, explains how that myth came about. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution by Kay Moore, illustrated by Daniel O’Leary gives an overview of what life was like in America shortly before and during the Revolutionary War for patriots and loyalists. (Error on page 25: George Washington’s half-brother, Lawrence, was not a loyalist; he died more than a decade before the start of the Revolutionary War. ) This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

The American Revolution by Nancy Ohlin, illustrated by Adam Larkum presents an overview of the American Revolution in short segments covering major events, specific people, and what was used and worn by soldiers during the war. The black-and-white illustrations work well with the text. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-5.

Do You Want to Be a Revolutionary War Soldier? by Thomas Ratliff gives an overview of what life was like for a private in the Continental Army or in a state militia company from enlistment in 1775 through the end of the war. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

George vs. George: The Revolutionary War as Seen by Both Sides by Rosalyn Schanzer does a good job of presenting the conflict and events leading up to the Revolutionary War and the events of the war from both the American and British points of view. It also shows who George Washington and who King George III were as individuals. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

The Boston Massacre (March 5, 1770)

John Adams was one of the lawyers who defended Captain Preston and the British soldiers at their trials. Books about him can be found in my U.S. Presidents post. Henry Knox was at the Boston Massacre, and Paul Revere made an engraving of the Boston Massacre which helped to increase anti-British sentiment. You can find books about them in the “Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War” section of this post.

Crispus Attucks by Monica Rausch gives information about Crispus Attucks’ life, the frustration about British soldiers being housed in Boston, the Boston Massacre, and how the victims of the Boston Massacre were honored. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-3.

Crispus Attucks and the Boston Massacre by Lynne Weiss presents one of the possible versions of Crispus Attucks’ life and his role in the Boston Massacre (Attuck’s death is better documented than his life, and there was some variation in witness accounts of the Boston Massacre). It also presents information about other notable African Americans who served during the Revolutionary War. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

The Boston Massacre by Michael Burgan, illustrated by Charles Barnett III, Bob Wiacek, and Keith Williams gives an overview of the events that led to the Boston Massacre, what happened the night of the Boston Massacre, and the aftermath of the Boston Massacre. Although the events related are not 100% accurate, the book does a good job of portraying the tension in Boston in 1770. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

The Boston Massacre by Andrew Santella relates the events that led to the Boston Massacre, what happened the night of the Boston Massacre, and the aftermath of the Boston Massacre including the trials of Captain Preston and the eight British soldiers who fired their weapons. This book is ideal for children in Grades 4-7.

The Boston Tea Party (December 16, 1773)

Paul Revere participated in the Boston Tea Party. You can find books about him in the “Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War” section of this post.

Boston Tea Party by Pamela Duncan Edwards, illustrated by Henry Cole gives an overview of the Boston Tea Party via a repeating text and mice. On each spread, the text adds a new piece of information before repeating the old information (think a historical version of There Was an Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly) and the mice provide additional commentary about what is occurring. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-2.

The Boston Tea Party by Russell Freedman, illustrated by Peter Malone provides an in-depth overview of the Boston Tea Party, including sharing about real people who participated in it. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-5.

You Wouldn’t Want to Be at the Boston Tea Party! (Revised Edition) by Peter Cook, illustrated by David Antram gives facts about the events that led to the Boston Tea Party and its aftermath. Readers are given the identity of George Robert Twelves Hewes, a real Boston shoemaker who was involved in the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, and are presented with what they (Hewes) are doing during different events. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-5.

What Was the Boston Tea Party? by Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Lauren Mortimer presents details about the Boston Tea Party, key events leading up to it, and the aftermath in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Paul Revere’s Ride (April 18, 1775) and the Battles of Lexington and Concord (April 19, 1775)

Paul Revere by Lisa Trumbauer gives an overview of Paul Revere’s life. At the bottom of each page is a timeline of Paul Revere’s life. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-2.

Who Was Paul Revere? by Roberta Edwards, illustrated by John O’Brien presents details about Paul Revere’s life in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Lexington and Concord: April 19, 1775 by Dale Andersen relates the events that led to the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Paul Revere’s ride and what the British were doing during that time, the battles themselves, the aftermath of the battles, and how the Battles of Lexington and Concord are remembered today. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-8.

The Declaration of Independence (July 4, 1776)

Although Thomas Jefferson was the main author of the Declaration of Independence, John Adams and Benjamin Franklin were also on the Declaration Committee. Additional books about John Adams and Thomas Jefferson can be found in my U.S. Presidents post. You can find books about Benjamin Franklin in the “Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War” section of this post.

When Mr. Jefferson Came to Philadelphia: What I Learned of Freedom, 1776 by Ann Turner, illustrated by Mark Hess tells the story of the Declaration of Independence and Thomas Jefferson’s views on freedom from the point of view of a fictional, young boy. This book is ideal for children in K-2.

Those Rebels, John & Tom by Barbara Kerley, illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham contrasts the lives and personalities of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson and shows how they used their differences to forward their shared belief that America should be independent. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

Declaration of Independence by Sarah Machajewski gives an overview of the events that led up to the creation of the Declaration of Independence and describes each of the document’s five parts. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-6.

What Is the Declaration of Independence? by Michael C. Harris, illustrated by Jerry Hoare presents details about the events that led up to the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and describes the purpose of the four parts of the document in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

The Signers: The 56 Stories Behind the Declaration of Independence by Dennis Brindell Fradin, illustrated by Michael McCurdy is divided by colony. Each colony’s section starts with a short history about the colony, a table with information about that colony’s signers, and a map of the thirteen colonies with the featured colony shaded in gray. The following pages contain brief summaries about the lives of each of the signers of the Declaration of Independence from that colony. This book is ideal for children in Grades 5-8.

Washington Crossed the Delaware (December 25-26, 1776), the Battle of Trenton (December 26, 1776), and the Battle of Princeton (January 2, 1777)

James Monroe fought in the Battle of Trenton, and Alexander Hamilton fought in the Battles of Trenton and Princeton. Books about George Washington and James Monroe can be found in my U.S. Presidents post. You can find books about Alexander Hamilton in the “Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War” section of this post.

When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots by Lynne Cheney, illustrated by Peter M. Fiore gives an overview of what led George Washington to cross the Delaware River, the Battle of Trenton, and the Battle of Princeton. In addition to the text and beautiful illustrations, each spread has a quote from someone who lived through the event covered on that spread. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-4.

The Crossing: How George Washington Saved the American Revolution by Jim Murphy relates Washington’s appointment to Commander of the Continental Army; gives an overview of the many times he was defeated or forced to retreat in 1776; shares what led him to cross the Delaware River; and tells about the crossing of the Delaware River, the Battle of Trenton, and the Battle of Princeton. This book is ideal for children in Grades 4-7.

Valley Forge (December 19, 1777-June 19, 1778) and the Battle of Monmouth (June 28, 1778)

Both George Washington and James Monroe encamped at Valley Forge and fought in the Battle of Monmouth. Books about them can be found in my U.S. Presidents post. Alexander Hamilton also wintered at Valley Forge. You can find books about him in the “Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War” section of this post.

Hanukkah at Valley Forge by Stephen Krensky, illustrated by Greg Harlin is a fictional retelling of an encounter that George Washington reportedly had with a Jew who had immigrated from Poland and was serving in the Continental Army. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-3.

Molly Pitcher by Larry Dane Brimner, illustrated by Patrick Girouard shares a little bit about the winter at Valley Forge but mostly focusses on how Molly Pitcher carried water to soldiers and fired a cannon after her husband collapsed during the Battle of Monmouth. At the back of the book is additional information about Mary Hays and the debate about whether or not Molly Pitcher was a real person or a legend. There is also a recipe for corn cakes. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-4.

Valley Forge by Richard Ammon, illustrated by Bill Farnsworth provides a breakdown of what the soldiers’ went through at Valley Forge. Each spread focusses on specific months and/or a specific aspect of life while wintering at Valley Forge. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-5.

The Winter at Valley Forge: Survival and Victory by James E. Knight, illustrated by George Guzzi relates what camp life was like for Colonial Army soldiers during the winter of 1777-78 from the point of view of a corporal. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

They Called Her Molly Pitcher by Anne Rockwell, illustrated by Cynthia von Buhler tells how Molly Pitcher wintered at Valley Forge with her husband and then carried water to soldiers and helped to fire a cannon after her husband collapsed during the Battle of Monmouth. At the back of the book is a timeline of important events of the Revolutionary War. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

Winter at Valley Forge by Matt Doeden, illustrated by Ron Frenz and Charles Barnett III gives an overview of what led George Washington to winter at Valley Forge, what the Continental Army suffered and did during the winter, and the Battle of Monmouth in graphic novel format. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Valley Forge by Michael Burgan relates the events that led to George Washington deciding to winter at Valley Forge, what the Continental Army suffered and did during the winter, and the significance of the Battle of Monmouth. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

The Winter of Red Snow: The Revolutionary War Diary of Abigail Jane Stewart, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, 1777 by Kristiana Gregory introduces readers to important figures of the Revolutionary War, the culture of the time period, and many of the issues facing the American army from an eleven-year-old girl’s perspective. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-8.

The Battle of Yorktown (September 28, 1781-October 19, 1781)

George Washington and Alexander Hamilton fought at the Battle of Yorktown. Books about George Washington can be found in my U.S. Presidents post. You can find books about Alexander Hamilton in the “Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War” section of this post.

A Spy Called James: The True Story of James Lafayette, Revolutionary War Double Agent by Anne Rockwell, illustrated by Floyd Cooper gives an overview of James Lafayette’s work as a double agent during the Revolutionary War and how his intelligence on the British set the American army up to win the Battle of Yorktown. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-5.

At the Battle of Yorktown: An Interactive Battlefield Adventure by Eric Mark Braun offers three story paths for readers to follow: a French captain fighting with the patriots, an African-American slave fighting in the Continental Army in exchange for his freedom, and a soldier’s wife working in the Continental Army. This book gives readers a good overview of different choices that people who were part of the Continental Army during the Battle of Yorktown could make and the potential consequences of those choices. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-7.

The Surrender at Yorktown by Melissa Whitcraft relates the events that led to the Revolutionary War, gives an overview of the war, relates what happened at the Battle of Yorktown, and summarizes how the Constitutional Convention marked the birth of the United States as the nation it is today. This book is ideal for children in Grades 4-7.

Historical Fiction

Hanukkah at Valley Forge by Stephen Krensky, illustrated by Greg Harlin is a fictional retelling of an encounter that George Washington reportedly had with a Jew who had immigrated from Poland and was serving in the Continental Army. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-3.

Buttons for General Washington by Connie and Peter Roop, illustrated by Peter E. Hanson is a fictional account of one of John Darragh’s journey’s to the Continental Army’s camp to deliver a coded message to his older brother. The Darragh’s, especially Mrs. Darragh, spied for the Americans during the Revolutionary War. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

Felicity: An American Girl shows the lead-up to and beginning of the Revolutionary War from the point of view of a nine-to-ten-year old patriot girl in Williamsburg, Virginia. As if learning to be a lady wasn’t hard enough, Felicity has to navigate the conflict between patriots and loyalists within her circle of close friends and family members. This series is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

I Survived the American Revolution, 1776 by Lauren Tarshis shows readers life in an American camp and the Battle of Brooklyn from the point of view of an eleven-year-old boy. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-5.

The Revolutionary War: An Interactive History Adventure by Elizabeth Raum offers three story paths for readers to follow: the daughter of a New York militia captain, a young Connecticut patriot, and a young loyalist from South Carolina. This book gives readers a good overview of different choices that people who lived in the United States during the American Revolution could make and the potential consequences of those choices. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-7.

At the Battle of Yorktown: An Interactive Battlefield Adventure by Eric Mark Braun offers three story paths for readers to follow: a French captain fighting with the patriots, an African-American slave fighting in the Continental Army in exchange for his freedom, and a soldier’s wife working in the Continental Army. This book gives readers a good overview of different choices that people who were part of the Continental Army during the Battle of Yorktown could make and the potential consequences of those choices. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-7.

The Winter at Valley Forge: Survival and Victory by James E. Knight, illustrated by George Guzzi relates what camp life was like for Colonial Army soldiers during the winter of 1777-78 from the point of view of a corporal. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

The Journal Of William Thomas Emerson: A Revolutionary War Patriot, Boston, Massachusetts, 1774 by Barry Denenberg shows readers what life was like in Boston in the years between the Boston Tea Party and the Battles of Lexington and Concord from the point of view of a twelve-year-old patriot. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-8.

Love Thy Neighbor: the Tory Diary of Prudence Emerson, Green Marsh, Massachusetts, 1774 by Ann Turner shows readers the beginnings of the American Revolution from the point of view of a thirteen-year-old loyalist. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-8.

The Winter of Red Snow: The Revolutionary War Diary of Abigail Jane Stewart, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, 1777 by Kristiana Gregory introduces readers to important figures of the Revolutionary War, the culture of the time period, and many of the issues facing the American army from an eleven-year-old girl’s perspective. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-8.

Contemporaries of the Revolutionary War

Presidents who were alive during the Revolutionary War (April 19, 1775–September 3, 1783) – You can find books about them in my U.S. presidents blog post:
  1. George Washington (Born: February 22, 1732)
  2. John Adams (Born: October 30, 1735)
  3. Thomas Jefferson (Born: April 13, 1743)
  4. James Madison (Born: March 16, 1751)
  5. James Monroe (Born: April 28, 1758)
  6. John Quincy Adams (Born: July 11, 1767)
  7. Andrew Jackson (Born: March 15, 1767)
  8. Martin Van Buren (Born: December 5, 1782)
  9. William Henry Harrison (Born: February 9, 1773)

Bonus: For short biography blurbs about people who lived in Boston, Massachusetts in the years leading up to the Revolutionary War, check out Revolutionary Spaces’ Revolutionary Characters.

Books already mentioned in an above section:

Abigail Adams by Jennifer Strand gives an overview of Abigail Adams’ life. At the back of the book are some facts about Abigail Adams and a timeline of her life. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-1.

Ben Franklin Thinks Big by Sheila Keenan, illustrated by Gustavo Mazali gives an overview of Benjamin Franklin’s life. At the back of the book is a timeline of Benjamin Franklin’s life and additional facts about him. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-3.

Alexander Hamilton: A Plan for America by Sarah Albee, illustrated by Chin Ko gives an overview of Alexander Hamilton’s life. At the back of the book is a timeline of Alexander Hamilton’s life and additional facts about him. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-3.

Paul Revere and the Bell Ringers by Jonah Winter, illustrated by Bert Dodson is based on how Paul Revere worked as a bell ringer at Christ Church (today Old North Church) during his teen years. At the back of the book is a time line of Paul Revere’s life. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-3.

Martha Washington by Sally Lee gives an overview of Martha Washington’s life. At the bottom of each page is a timeline of Martha Washington’s life. This book is ideal for children in Pre-K-2.

A Picture Book of Benjamin Franklin by David A. Adler, illustrated by John and Alexandra Wallner gives an overview of Benjamin Franklin’s life. At the back of the book is a timeline of Benjamin Franklin’s life. This book is ideal for children in K-3.

Phillis Sings Out Freedom: The Story of George Washington and Phillis Wheatley by Ann Malaspina, illustrated by Susan Keeter gives an overview of the desperate situation the George Washington found himself and the American army in, Phillis Wheatley’s life, and the poem she sent George Washington to encourage him. The final page provides additional information about George Washington and Phillis Wheatley. This book is ideal for children in K-3.

Alexander Hamilton: From Orphan to Founding Father by Monica Kulling, illustrated by Valerio Fabbretti gives an overview of Alexander Hamilton’s life. This book is ideal for children in K-3.

Eliza Hamilton: Founding Mother by Monica Kulling, illustrated by Valerio Fabbretti gives an overview of Eliza Hamilton’s life. This book is ideal for children in K-3.

Heroes of the Revolution by David A. Adler, illustrated by Donald A. Smith gives an overview of twelve men and women who served their country, risking, and some sacrificing, their lives for their country during the Revolutionary War. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-4.

A Picture Book of Samuel Adams by David A. Adler and Michael S. Adler, illustrated by Ronald Himler gives an overview of Samuel Adams’ life. At the back of the book is a timeline of Samuel Adams’ life. This book is ideal for children in 1-4.

I am Benjamin Franklin by Brad Meltzer, illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos gives an overview of Benjamin Franklin’s life. The text breaks the fourth wall so that Benjamin Franklin is speaking to the reader, and the illustrations are comic-esque. At the back of the book is a timeline of Benjamin Franklin’s life and four photos of portraits or items that depict him. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-4.

Eliza: The Story of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton by Margaret McNamara, illustrated by Esmé Shapiro gives an overview of Eliza Hamilton’s life in the form of a fictional letter to her unborn great-grandchild. This book is ideal for children in Grades 1-4

Sybil Ludington’s Midnight Ride by Marsha Amstel, illustrated by Ellen Beier tells of Sybil Ludington’s approximately 40-mile night ride to call her father’s troops to assemble to defend Danbury, Connecticut. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

Nathan Hale: Patriot Spy by Shannon Zemlicka, illustrated by Craig Orback gives an overview of Nathan Hale’s life. At the back of the book is a timeline of important events in Nathan Hale’s life. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-4.

Henry Knox: Bookseller, Soldier, Patriot by Anita Silvey, illustrated by Wendell Minor gives an overview of Henry Knox’s life. At the back of the book is a timeline of Henry Knox’s life. This book is ideal for children in 2-4.

Duel!: Burr and Hamilton’s Deadly War of Words by Dennis Brindell Fradin, illustrated by Larry Day gives an overview of the similarities between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton’s lives, their rivalry and opinions of each other, and the duel they fought. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-5.

Revolutionary Rogues: John André and Benedict Arnold by Selene Castrovilla, illustrated by John O’Brien introduces John André and Benedict Arnold as individuals and then relates Benedict Arnold’s act of treason from the men’s first correspondence through John André’s hanging. The last pages of the book explain the aftermath of the treason and give additional information about the lives of John André and Benedict Arnold. This book is ideal for children in Grades 2-5.

The Horse-Riding Adventure of Sybil Ludington, Revolutionary War Messenger by Marsha Amstel, illustrated by Ted Hammond and Richard Carbajal tells of Sybil Ludington’s approximately 40-mile night ride to call her father’s troops to assemble to defend Danbury, Connecticut. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

Thomas Paine Writes Common Sense by Gary Jeffrey begins with historical information about the colonists’ sentiments about the Revolutionary War in 1775 and how Thomas Paine moved from England to America, then presents Paine’s writing of Common Sense in graphic novel style, and concludes with information about some of Paine’s other significant writings and how they were received. This book is ideal for children in 3-5.

John Hancock by Candice Ransom gives an overview of John Hancock’s life. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-5.

The Schuyler Sisters by Monika Davies gives an overview of the lives of the two oldest Schuyler sisters’ lives: Angelica Church and Eliza Hamilton. This book is ideal for children in Grades 4-6.

Nathan Hale: Revolutionary Spy by Nathan Olson, illustrated by Cynthia Martin and Brent Schoonover gives an overview of Nathan Hale’s life in a graphic novel format. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Patrick Henry: Liberty or Death by Jason Glaser, illustrated by Peter McDonnell gives an overview of Patrick Henry’s life in a graphic novel format. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

A Voice of Her Own: The Story of Phillis Wheatley, Slave Poet by Kathryn Lasky, illustrated by Paul Lee gives an overview of Phillis Wheatley’s life, poems, and the beginning of the Revolutionary War. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Who Was Abigail Adams? by True Kelley, illustrated by John O’Brien presents details about Abigail Adams’ life in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Who Was Benedict Arnold? by James Buckley Jr., illustrated by Gregory Copeland presents details about Benedict Arnold’s life in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Who Was Ben Franklin? by Dennis Brindell Fradin, illustrated by John O’Brien presents details about Ben Franklin’s life in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Who Was Alexander Hamilton? by Pam Pollack and Meg Belviso, illustrated by Dede Putra presents details about Alexander Hamilton’s life in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Who Was Betsy Ross? by James Buckley Jr., illustrated by John O’Brien presents details about Betsy Ross’ life in a chapter book format that is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Benjamin Rush: The Common Good by Janet and Geoff Benge presents a detailed overview of Benjamin Rush’s life in a chapter book format that reads like a novel. This book is ideal for children in Grades 3-7.

Crafts

English – Ordinary People Made History; You Can, Too

  • Write an Article about an Important Issue: Articles and pamphlets played an important part of swaying public opinion leading up to and during the Revolutionary War. Write an article about an issue that is important to you. Publish it online or submit it to a newspaper or magazine, or send it to the president, your representative, and/or your senators.
  • Give a Speech about Someone Who Contributed to America Winning the Revolutionary War: Research someone who contributed to the patriot’s cause during the Revolutionary War. Give an informative speech about that person. In addition to providing some background about his/her early years, contribution(s) to the American Revolution, and final years, share about that person’s key character traits and how he/she used them along with his/her skills to serve his/her country.

Games

Songs

Video Summaries of the Revolutionary War

Happy reading!

Katie

P.S.

For more themed book recommendations and activities, visit my post library.

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